Millennials’ DIY Skills Are “Pathetic”

Far West

Honolii Beach
#1
With Father's day around the corner... these articles are going to be popping up... what say you?

My millennial sons are not dads, but each of them can fix cars, houses, computers, landscape, use a chainsaw, add another circuit to the breaker box and very rarely pay someone else to work on their homes. But I know many that fit what the article says. I can do more than many millennial dads...

Is the problem no one trusted them to use power tools? The little snowflakes might hurt themselves?

Millennial Dads Vs. Baby Boomer Dads: Millennials’ DIY Skills Are “Pathetic” By Comparison
According to new research, millennial dads are less capable than their own dads when it comes to everyday DIY fixes. Millennial dads prefer to rely on professional help instead. Millennial dads are less likely than their boomer counterparts to be able to change a car tire on the side of the road, unblock a toilet or sink, reset a tripped circuit breaker, or even open a stuck pickle jar with their hands. Not only does this lack of basic DIY skill mean home repairs are often left longer unfixed, but it also means millennials are spending more money on things than baby boomers who already know how to do those menial repairs.

<snip>

“Today’s time-pressed dads are quick to master new tools like apps and mobile technology for their families’ benefit. They’re also more likely to outsource time-consuming home maintenance to professionals who have the tools and training to get the job done right — a handy trade-off that enables today’s dads to spend more time with the people they love.”

https://thewashingtonstandard.com/m...nnials-diy-skills-are-pathetic-by-comparison/
 
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JawJa

Driving Instructor
#2
It is said: This new generation has 'flunked the prosperity test'...

Obviously there are many ways to interpret that statement...
However not knowing how to fix something... just pay someone to do it... may well be one of them.
 

J-man

This post will self-destruct in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1....
Staff member
#3
I think many people have more money than time available so the quick solution is to pay someone to get the job done. I don't make money when I'm doing honey-do projects yet they must still be done and we normally have a busy schedule during the weekends. Plus it's often more expense to pay someone to "fix" a screwed up project than just having them do it from the beginning.
 

Paxilpapa

Serenity, through modern chemistry
#4
I think many people have more money than time available so the quick solution is to pay someone to get the job done. I don't make money when I'm doing honey-do projects yet they must still be done and we normally have a busy schedule during the weekends. Plus it's often more expense to pay someone to "fix" a screwed up project than just having them do it from the beginning.
Especially if you don't own a hammer drill like a certain Nashvillian!!!!
 
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Guard Dad

Administrator
Staff member
#5
One thing that bugs me is that so many millennials don't have the skills to work with their hands. They don't know how to work with tools, fix their cars, build anything, not even fix a leaky toilet or replace a light fixture.

Certainly, some do, but not many from what I see, When I grew up, most kids learned at least basic skills from their fathers. We tinkered with our cars, we built stuff, etc.

Now granted, I'm not normal in this respect, but I can't imagine a life where I didn't have tools and were not able to use them to build or fix stuff. I freakin' live for it! A buddy and I were talking the other day, he's my age but in very poor physical condition and he can't do much anymore. I am actually frightened of the day when I won't be able to work and build/fix stuff. I'll be a wreck.

Yeah, I know. I'm weird.
 

Guard Dad

Administrator
Staff member
#6
I think many people have more money than time available so the quick solution is to pay someone to get the job done. I don't make money when I'm doing honey-do projects yet they must still be done and we normally have a busy schedule during the weekends. Plus it's often more expense to pay someone to "fix" a screwed up project than just having them do it from the beginning.
My dad gave me several pearls of wisdom when I was a kid that have stuck with me. One was "Son, learn how to repair everything you can, especially stuff in your own home. In the future, labor will become extremely expensive, and you won't be able to pay someone to fix every little thing that breaks." He was right.
 
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Boss 302

Pursuit Driver
#7
My dad gave me several pearls of wisdom when I was a kid that have stuck with me. One was "Son, learn how to repair everything you can, especially stuff in your own home. In teh future, labor will become extremely expensive, and you won't be able to pay someone to fix every little thing that breaks." He was right.
My father was the same way and still is. He fixes everything around his house unless it's his HVAC system. He taught us how to use tools and how to fix things. I remember him teaching me how to change plugs on a car, change the oil, and how to set the timing.
 

JawJa

Driving Instructor
#10
As noted...

Perhaps there were more things being taught when Dad taught his son (or daughter) to fix things???

And I wonder if those lessons that did not happen (other than actually how to fix it)...
Would have produced a more productive member of society???
 

Far West

Honolii Beach
#11
You know, the other side might say many did not grow up in a house. They lived in a condo or apartment where they did not own it or have the space for tools or a workshop. They were not responsible to fix it or they paid a monthly amount to keep things fixed?
 

J-man

This post will self-destruct in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1....
Staff member
#13
I get what you're saying and I agree, I used to love fixing my own stuff. Having the knowledge and tools necessary to do tasks yourself is not only self-gratifying but can also save tons of money over the years. I'm just at a point in my life where I don't want a garage full of tools which I rarely use for projects in which I have no interest other than them needing to be done. I work hard at my job, when I'm off I don't want to work at projects. I have enough hobbies which take up my free time. If I was doing my own repairs when would I have to time to post on the Hwy?
 

MacDaddy

Training wheel examiner
#17
I can sorta follow the article summary. That millennials would rather pay to have something done, and have their time freed up. I can even relate to it for some projects that could be considered do it yourself. Guess everyone draws that line at a different place.

I think a few should reconsider where that line is, as it would save them a lot of money. All fine and dandy to have that time, but don't start complaining when you spent the money to gain the time.
 

Boss 302

Pursuit Driver
#19
My wife gave me a Dewalt 12" compound miter saw for Christmas 2 years ago. I haven't had the time to use it. There are some projects I would like to make, but haven't had the time. I rarely get two consecutive days off. I drive an hour to work and an hour home; making it a 12-hr day. When I have a day off, all I want to do is rest.
 
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